The pseudo-expert

A week or so after our first child’s birth we met our health visitor, Penny. She was possibly in her early sixties and had worked with babies all her life. She was rather forthright in her advice but with the wisdom of 40 years behind her I was always open to her suggestions. Our baby refused to sleep in her first weeks. This meant I was getting one or two hours sleep a night myself and Penny’s reassuring advice kept me going. I can never forget one afternoon when our daughter was about 15 days old and Penny walked into our living room, taking in the situation almost immediately. “Now Heather,” she said, “I’m just going to pop baby in her Moses basket on her front. Don’t worry that she is on her front as you can keep an eye on her and if I roll up this cot blanket (deftly twisted in seconds) and put it under her tummy the pressure will make baby feel more comfortable…” Our daughter fell asleep immediately and Penny left soon after but SIX WHOLE HOURS later our baby was STILL sleeping soundly. She knew the specific risk to our baby from sleeping on her front was negligible and that it might just pull the parents back from the brink. I’m grateful to her for using her professional judgement that day.

Penny’s practical but sometimes controversial wisdom contrasted with the general quality of advice available at weekly baby clinic. Mums who were unable to think of an excuse to queue for Penny were told that ‘each baby was different’ and ‘mum and baby need to find their own way’. The other health visitors did dispense some forms of advice. If your baby wasn’t sleeping you could “try cutting out food types. Some mums swear its broccoli that does it” or “you could try homeopathy.”  The other health visitors had no time for Penny’s old fashioned belief that mothers could be told how to care for their babies. Instead of sharing acquired wisdom they uncritically passed on to mothers the latest diktats from on high (that seemed to originate from the pressure groups that held most sway over government) and a garbled mish-mash of pseudo-science.

A twitter conversation today brought back those memories. The early years teacher I was in discussion with bemoaned the lack of proper training for early years practitioners. Fair enough but what was striking was the examples she gave of the consequential poor practice. Apparently without proper training teachers wouldn’t understand about ‘developmental readiness’, ‘retained reflexes‘ or the mental health problems caused by a ‘too much too soon’ curriculum. The problem is that these examples of expertise to be gained from ‘proper’ training are actually just unproven theory or pseudo-science. The wisdom of the lady in her fifties who has worked for donkey’s at the little local day nursery is suspect if she is not ‘properly trained’. But trained in what? The modern reluctance to tell others how they should conduct themselves has created a vacuum that must be filled with pseudo-expertise masquerading as wisdom.

How often do teachers feel that they can’t point to their successful track record to prove their worth and instead must advocate shiny ‘initiatives’ based on the latest pastoral or pedagogical fads dressed up as science? The expert is far from always right but I value their wisdom. I also value the considered use of scientific research in education. Too often though these are sidelined and replaced with something far worse.

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